Memphis Tigers center James Wiseman celebrates a play against the South Carolina State Bulldogs on November 5, 2019 at the FedExForum.

Joe Murphy/Getty

The NBA season starts in two weeks, and with no Summer League and shortened training camps and preseason, the incoming rookie class will have to adapt quickly to the association.

Of course, some will adapt more quickly than others, and their numbers will reflect it. Players like James Wiseman on a contending Warriors squad. High-flying Knicks forward Obi Toppin who will be putting guys on posters all season. Frenchman Killian Hayes, who according to Pistons head coach Dwayne Casey is the team's starting facilitator.

These young studs and many more could have big roles from the jump and thus be viable fantasy basketball candidates.

That being said, here are five rookies that should be rostered in fantasy leagues this season, factoring in their teams' current situations and the players' projected stats.


5. Killian Hayes

19-year-old Hayes is already being given the keys to the car, though the car is a Ford Focus. But maybe Hayes will turn the Focus into a Mustang; we'll see. For now, he brings a combination of shooting, driving and playmaking to a Detroit team that is in need of elite guard play aside from Derrick Rose, who wants to help groom the rookie into a star.

They have so many forwards on their roster that we might see Blake Griffin starting alongside Hayes in the backcourt (only partly joking).

But at 6-foot-5 and with an 80-inch wingspan, the international point guard exhibits the ability to score at all three levels. He's patient when looking to attack the rim and has good body control, but he's going to have to develop a right-handed drive over time.

Projected stats: 14.3 PPG, 5.5 APG, 4.1 RPG, 35% 3PT FG

4. Obi Toppin - Knicks

The Knicks actually had a decent offseason, which is rare to say, and it was highlighted by drafting the guy they had been eyeing for a while: Obi Toppin. The 22-year-old forward was the NCAAM AP Player of the Year and is known for doing things like this in games:

Because of his age and talent, Toppin should be a plug-and-play option who sees a lot of minutes early on. He's not locked in as a starter yet, as Julius Randle will presumably fill that slot. But Toppin could quickly overtake Randle as the team's top power forward as his game complements that of sophomore guard RJ Barrett's better.

Also noteworthy, the 6-foot-9 New York native has been working on his three ball nonstop during the offseason, an area that Randle has struggled with. Last season at Dayton, Toppin averaged 20 points and 7.5 rebounds on 63% shooting in about 32 min a game, including 39% from deep, although he barely attempted three triples a night. Regardless, he will provide the Knicks with some much-needed energy as they look to dig out of their lengthy hole of irrelevancy.

Projected stats: 13.5 PPG, 7 RPG, 1.2 BPG, 54% FG

3. James Wiseman - Warriors

After playing just three games at Memphis for Penny Hardaway, James Wiseman went No. 2 overall to the Warriors and immediately fills the team's need for a starting center. He's not expected to be a nightly 20/10 guy, though that was his average in his brief collegiate career, even as the Dubs aim to get back in the playoffs.

But Wiseman will be playing in a Steve Kerr system centered around the GOAT shooter in Stephen Curry and one of the league best passing forwards in Draymond Green. The 7-foot-1 big will be involved in both PNR and pick-and-pop action, as he can space the floor with his shooting. He will benefit from short dump off passes, lobs, running the floor and will clean up the glass on both sides of the floor. Draymond will maximize the rookie's length on defense, too.

Projected stats: 14.6 PPG, 8.1 RPG, 1.8 BPG, 58% FG

2. Anthony Edwards

He went first in this year's draft, but I have him second on this list. Nevertheless, Anthony Edwards has drawn comparisons to James Harden, though he compares himself to Dwayne Wade. Edwards' 6-foot-5, 225-pound frame is more than ideal for a shooting guard, and with an 82-inch wingspan and 42-inch vertical — he will be finishing above the rim more often than not and can make a defensive impact as well.

His perimeter shooting might be inconsistent at times, as the 19-year-old connected on just 29% of his triples in his lone season at Georgia. But he should get some quality looks in a lineup featuring a talented duo of Karl-Anthony Towns and D'Angelo Russell.

But playing alongside two All-Stars makes Edwards the third option, which isn't bad for a guy who wants to be playing football.

Projected stats: 15.1 PPG, 4.2 RPG, 2.6 APG, 44% FG, 31% 3PT FG

1. LaMelo Ball - Hornets

The No. 3 overall pick in 2020, LaMelo Ball enters a crowded Charlotte Hornets backcourt that features Terry Rozier and Devonte' Graham. Rozier is coming off career-highs of 18 PPG, 4.1 APG and 40% three-point shooting in the 2019-20 season — the first of his three-year, $57 million contract.

Graham, on the other hand, skyrocketed in his sophomore season, averaging 18.2 points and 7.5 assists after scoring less than five points a game the season prior.

But the 19-year-old Ball is a highly-touted prospect, and at 6-foot-8, his size combined with his playmaking and finishing ability could slot him as the team's starting point guard. Starting Rozier and Graham would leave Charlotte undersized in the backcourt, and with neither guard being a defensive specialist, that could be a problem.

LaMelo Ball's Teammates Say His VISION For Game NEXT LEVEL youtu.be


Plus, you don't draft a guy top-3 and bring him off the bench, right? I mean, you got that pick because your team sucked last season.

LaMelo will have the ball in his hands a lot (see what I did there) and will emerge as one of the team's best playmakers in addition to newly acquired veteran forward Gordon Hayward. The guard might struggle with his outside jumper a bit, but he's shown he has the range and confidence to take to take and make long-distance jumpers. He's my pick for Rookie of the Year.

Projected stats: 14.2 PPG, 6.8 APG, 6.6 RPG, 1.2 SPG

Josh Allen scampers for a gain against the Colts in the third quarter of the wild card game.

Harry Scull Jr. /Buffalo News

As the NFL postseason got underway last week, it became clear we need to make some halftime adjustments with our picks this week.

The Ravens were an easy cover for us, especially once Lamer found his groove and the grooves in Tennessee's D. Throw in a few head scratching punts by Mike Vrabel and that does the trick.

Meanwhile, Stefon Diggs came up two catches short for us with three targets left on the table. It was always going to be tough to get that many grabs, but it was worth a few bucks just to see what would happen.

Please, please, please remind me never to bet unders. I haven't hit one all year and yet the siren's song calls me to shore. I maintain this is the best one I bet all year. The pick 6 and DK Metcalf bomb in the second quarter killed after the best start imaginable. After 15 minutes, we had a combined score of 3, 15 minutes of game time later? 30. Bananas.

Then I don't really know what else to say about Pittsburgh losing to Baker Mayfield and co. that hasn't already been said. I just have to edit my list of completely impossible things to put, "Snowing in the Sahara desert," and "Taylor Swift ever getting back together with Jake Gyllenhaal" above "The Browns beating the Steelers in the playoffs."


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Wizards guard Bradley Beal looks on in a game against the Celtics on Jan. 8, 2021.

Brian Babineau/NBAE via Getty Images

Put on your general manager hat for a moment and ask yourself this question: If my team struggled mightily the past couple seasons, is struggling now and will continue to struggle, would I trade my franchise star?

It's an extremely difficult decision to make, but it's something the Washington Wizards have to be pondering with shooting guard Bradley Beal.

Beal has been on an absolute rampage through 11 games, posting a league-high 34.9 points per game on 49% shooting and 38% from distance. He's also dishing out five assists and grabbing 5.3 rebounds with 1.5 steals. All that in 36 minutes a night, yet the Wizards are 3-8 which is the third-worst record in the Eastern Conference.

"I'm pissed off," Beal told reporters after his 60-point game on Jan. 6. "I'm mad. I don't count [them]. ... Any of my career-highs, they've been in losses. So I don't give a damn. You can throw it right out the window with the other two or three I've had."

His frustration is evident, and though he hasn't verbalized that he wants out of D.C., it's hard not to think that the idea hasn't crossed his mind at least once with how bad the Wizards have been recently.

From 2018-20, they went a combined 57-97 with John Wall sidelined after he tore his Achilles. Before this season began, the Wizards acquired Russell Westbrook in exchange for Wall and a pick, thinking they were getting an upgrade at point guard. Plot twist, they weren't.

Wall is healthy and playing good basketball in Houston while Westbrook is sitting back-to-backs and is currently nursing a quad injury. More importantly, he doesn't make them much better because of his lack of defense and is thus piling up meaningless triple-doubles that don't translate to team success.


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Each Friday, FindBet will preview the week's DFS slate, highlighting players that are priced well on DFS sites, as well as some contrarian plays that can push your team to the top of the leader board.

Most NFL DFS games have you putting a team together with players from a certain slate of games. It could be just Sunday 1:00 PM games, or it could be every game that is slated for the week. Once the last game that has eligible players is over, the final payouts are made according to how many fantasy points each team scored. Each player is worth a certain dollar amount, and you have a cap of $60,000 to build your team with. You have to have 1 QB, 2 RB, 3 WR, 1 TE, 1 FLEX (RB, WR, or TE) and 1 DEF.

The general scoring rules include (6) points for each rushing and receiving touchdown, (4) points for each passing touchdown, (0.1) points for each rushing and receiving yard gained, (0.04) points for each passing yard, and also (0.5) points for each reception. There are other scoring opportunities for defenses. Let's take a look at players we like in the first round of the NFL playoffs this weekend.

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